April 19, 2013

Alan Tudyk portrays racism of 1940’s America in ‘42’; realizes “how far we have to go” http://dft.ba/-5zCt http://dft.ba/-5Al6

April 11, 2013

"Accidental Racist" tries but fails to open up convo about racism today; endorses stereotypes & racism instead http://dft.ba/-5B05 http://dft.ba/-5B06

April 5, 2013
The Associated Press (AP) has caused a stir in the media world by banning the term “illegal immigrant.” Since many journalism and media outlets tend to follow the AP Stylebook’s rules, this has caused debate on whether the term is indeed offensive as the AP has concluded. On the AP blog, Kathleen Carroll, Senior Vice President and Executive Editor, explained the reasoning behind this and other recent changes to the AP Stylebook. Carroll stated that the English language is always evolving and that the AP did not believe in labeling people, but instead behavior.
Two reactions have been seen throughout news sources. The liberal side is applauding the AP for this and other changes regarding labeling people while the conservative side believes that term was accurate in its description and did not need to be banned. However, the AP chose to remove this term from their stylebook because the English language has evolved so that an illegal person is seen as an lawless being in all things while only certain actions, such as overstaying their visa or crossing the border, is illegal. This can lead to stereotyping of whole races, such as Mexicans or Latin Americans, and presenting a negative view for a whole group.
Sources
'Illegal immigrant' no more
AP Changes Stylebook on ‘Illegal Immigrants’
"Illegal Immigrants"

The Associated Press (AP) has caused a stir in the media world by banning the term “illegal immigrant.” Since many journalism and media outlets tend to follow the AP Stylebook’s rules, this has caused debate on whether the term is indeed offensive as the AP has concluded. On the AP blog, Kathleen Carroll, Senior Vice President and Executive Editor, explained the reasoning behind this and other recent changes to the AP Stylebook. Carroll stated that the English language is always evolving and that the AP did not believe in labeling people, but instead behavior.

Two reactions have been seen throughout news sources. The liberal side is applauding the AP for this and other changes regarding labeling people while the conservative side believes that term was accurate in its description and did not need to be banned. However, the AP chose to remove this term from their stylebook because the English language has evolved so that an illegal person is seen as an lawless being in all things while only certain actions, such as overstaying their visa or crossing the border, is illegal. This can lead to stereotyping of whole races, such as Mexicans or Latin Americans, and presenting a negative view for a whole group.

Sources

'Illegal immigrant' no more

AP Changes Stylebook on ‘Illegal Immigrants’

"Illegal Immigrants"

March 28, 2013

Women, rejoice! We have a tablet made specifically for us! Joining the Bic Pens for Her, the ePad Femme is the Eurostar Group’s answer to the appalling lack of tablets for women. The tablet comes preprogrammed with all the necessary feminine apps: yoga techniques, recipes, dieting tips, shopping lists, and more. And it already has a pink background and case, the only color women like.
Because women have so much difficulty downloading apps, changing backgrounds, and working technology altogether, right?
The ePad Femme represents a variety of stereotypes for women: we only are interested in cooking, dieting, and shopping; pink is the only color for us; and we are inept with technology. These stereotypes are harmful and completely untrue. Women have interests beyond our bodies and the color pink. For example, I cannot cook to save my life, my favorite color has never been pink, and technology is a huge part of my life. My interests do not revolve around my body, but around my personality. This tablet is an example of why we still need feminism: some people still seem to think that this is acceptable and good.
Sources:
ePad Femme: Finally, a Tablet For Women. (Insert Sexist Joke Here)
ePad Femme, Tablet For Women, Hits The Market In The Middle East
First tablet for women launches with pink background and pre-loaded with cooking, diet apps

Women, rejoice! We have a tablet made specifically for us! Joining the Bic Pens for Her, the ePad Femme is the Eurostar Group’s answer to the appalling lack of tablets for women. The tablet comes preprogrammed with all the necessary feminine apps: yoga techniques, recipes, dieting tips, shopping lists, and more. And it already has a pink background and case, the only color women like.

Because women have so much difficulty downloading apps, changing backgrounds, and working technology altogether, right?

The ePad Femme represents a variety of stereotypes for women: we only are interested in cooking, dieting, and shopping; pink is the only color for us; and we are inept with technology. These stereotypes are harmful and completely untrue. Women have interests beyond our bodies and the color pink. For example, I cannot cook to save my life, my favorite color has never been pink, and technology is a huge part of my life. My interests do not revolve around my body, but around my personality. This tablet is an example of why we still need feminism: some people still seem to think that this is acceptable and good.

Sources:

ePad Femme: Finally, a Tablet For Women. (Insert Sexist Joke Here)

ePad Femme, Tablet For Women, Hits The Market In The Middle East

First tablet for women launches with pink background and pre-loaded with cooking, diet apps

March 22, 2013
All My Relations Arts, a gallery dedicated to contemporary American Indian art, is currently showing the exhibit Make It Pop. Make It Pop is a collection of eleven artists work about the relationship between American Indians and pop culture, especially the inappropriate misuse of American Indian culture. The pieces include In-Appropriate 3, a painting of a Victoria Secret model dressed in turquoise jewelry, leopard print undergarments, and a headdress from the November fashion show and Stereotype: The Barrymore, a literal stereo redesigned with a headdress and dreamcatchers.

These pieces show the misuse of American Indian’s important religious and cultural symbols in pop culture. The headdress especially is traditionally worn only by important figures in the community. When people wear headdresses for fun or for decoration, they degrade the value of the symbol. I believe this art exhibit is a good way to explain American Indian heritage in an easy and open way, allowing for respect and understanding. By becoming aware of other people’s histories, we can learn to respect them and their beliefs.

Sources:
All My Relations Arts
Make It Pop
Native American artists take back the headdress

All My Relations Arts, a gallery dedicated to contemporary American Indian art, is currently showing the exhibit Make It Pop. Make It Pop is a collection of eleven artists work about the relationship between American Indians and pop culture, especially the inappropriate misuse of American Indian culture. The pieces include In-Appropriate 3, a painting of a Victoria Secret model dressed in turquoise jewelry, leopard print undergarments, and a headdress from the November fashion show and Stereotype: The Barrymore, a literal stereo redesigned with a headdress and dreamcatchers.

image

These pieces show the misuse of American Indian’s important religious and cultural symbols in pop culture. The headdress especially is traditionally worn only by important figures in the community. When people wear headdresses for fun or for decoration, they degrade the value of the symbol. I believe this art exhibit is a good way to explain American Indian heritage in an easy and open way, allowing for respect and understanding. By becoming aware of other people’s histories, we can learn to respect them and their beliefs.

image

Sources:

All My Relations Arts

Make It Pop

Native American artists take back the headdress

March 7, 2013
Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook, officially launched the website Lean In on March 6 with a follow up book of the same title to be released on March 11. Lean In is way to encourage and hear about ambitious women and learning from and supporting other women especially in regards to the workplace. The three ways Lean In supports women is through: community, education, and circles. Women are provided information about how to succeed in their jobs, when to lean in, and how to balance different desires, mainly the balance between work and family by forming “circles.”
Encouraging women dealing with the difficulties of workplace inequality is the key to the site and the book. This relates back to our class lectures and my last blog post about women in sports journalism. Women need to be seen more throughout all workplaces, rising through the various ranks and breaking into previously male-dominated jobs. I believe this site and the ways to connect with other inspiring women is a great way for people to learn and achieve greater things. Though this site is not currently completely applicable to me, as I am not in the job industry currently, I will continue to read the encouraging stories and posts.
Sources:
Lean In website
Sheryl Sandberg Launches ‘Lean In’ Organization As A Global Community For Workplace Equality
Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In Site and Groups Launch - Will They Make A Difference?
Why I Want Women To Lean In

Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook, officially launched the website Lean In on March 6 with a follow up book of the same title to be released on March 11. Lean In is way to encourage and hear about ambitious women and learning from and supporting other women especially in regards to the workplace. The three ways Lean In supports women is through: community, education, and circles. Women are provided information about how to succeed in their jobs, when to lean in, and how to balance different desires, mainly the balance between work and family by forming “circles.”

Encouraging women dealing with the difficulties of workplace inequality is the key to the site and the book. This relates back to our class lectures and my last blog post about women in sports journalism. Women need to be seen more throughout all workplaces, rising through the various ranks and breaking into previously male-dominated jobs. I believe this site and the ways to connect with other inspiring women is a great way for people to learn and achieve greater things. Though this site is not currently completely applicable to me, as I am not in the job industry currently, I will continue to read the encouraging stories and posts.

Sources:

Lean In website

Sheryl Sandberg Launches ‘Lean In’ Organization As A Global Community For Workplace Equality

Sheryl Sandberg’s Lean In Site and Groups Launch - Will They Make A Difference?

Why I Want Women To Lean In

February 28, 2013
ESPN Films and espnW recently announced the titles and summaries of film documentaries to be screened during Nine for IX. Nine for IX delves into the stories of women in the sports industry, including athletes, coaches, and journalists. One Nine for IX film this year,  ’Let Them Wear Towels,’ investigates the history of women sports journalists, highlighting the legal cases of Lisa Olson and Melissa Ludtke and their fight for equality in the industry.
As a young woman heading into the media industry, I need equality in this workplace and in all workplaces. Double standards and restrictions based on gender should no longer exist. Hopefully films like ‘Let Them Wear Towels,’ the Nine for IX  and other informative media about the struggles of women in sports will continue to stamp out sexism in the sports media industry.
Sources:
ESPN Films and espnW Announce Nine for IX
Nine for IX: ‘Let Them Wear Towels’
Ticket Picture

ESPN Films and espnW recently announced the titles and summaries of film documentaries to be screened during Nine for IX. Nine for IX delves into the stories of women in the sports industry, including athletes, coaches, and journalists. One Nine for IX film this year,  ’Let Them Wear Towels,’ investigates the history of women sports journalists, highlighting the legal cases of Lisa Olson and Melissa Ludtke and their fight for equality in the industry.

As a young woman heading into the media industry, I need equality in this workplace and in all workplaces. Double standards and restrictions based on gender should no longer exist. Hopefully films like ‘Let Them Wear Towels,’ the Nine for IX  and other informative media about the struggles of women in sports will continue to stamp out sexism in the sports media industry.

Sources:

ESPN Films and espnW Announce Nine for IX

Nine for IX: ‘Let Them Wear Towels’

Ticket Picture

February 21, 2013
CBS’s new fall TV show, Elementary, was highly criticized when it was announced that not only was the character John Watson going to be portrayed by a woman, but by Lucy Liu, an Asian-American. Both media critics and long-time Sherlock fans were outraged with these changes, stating that Watson has been, and always should be, a man. They claimed they were not trying to be sexist or racist but they were. These same people were okay with the update of the show to modern times and the move to New York, but drew the line at Liu.
Though we specifically talked about the African-American community in class, the lack of media representation applies to all minorities, including Asian-Americans. Lucy Liu agrees “that it’s nice she can represent a certain group of people. ‘It feels really good to be always breaking down walls and starting something new.”
As a fan of the many adaptations of Sherlock Holmes, I was surprised that they had chosen to make this change. Now, as an avid viewer of Elementary, I can easily say that Lucy Liu is one of the best Watsons I have seen. Her character shows both strengths and weaknesses, intelligence and courage.  Watson is not just a sidekick to Holmes, she is now a full-on partner, helping and leading in cases. And the best part is that Liu has helped portray the Asian-American minority in media. I’ve rarely seen minorities as main leads in the TV I have watched, especially women of color.
Sources:
Lucy Liu Puts a New Spin on Sherlock Holmes’s Sidekick Watson
Dr. Joan Watson, Racism, And The Sherlock Vs. Elementary Backlash
TV: Halloween And New Shows

CBS’s new fall TV show, Elementary, was highly criticized when it was announced that not only was the character John Watson going to be portrayed by a woman, but by Lucy Liu, an Asian-American. Both media critics and long-time Sherlock fans were outraged with these changes, stating that Watson has been, and always should be, a man. They claimed they were not trying to be sexist or racist but they were. These same people were okay with the update of the show to modern times and the move to New York, but drew the line at Liu.

Though we specifically talked about the African-American community in class, the lack of media representation applies to all minorities, including Asian-Americans. Lucy Liu agrees “that it’s nice she can represent a certain group of people. ‘It feels really good to be always breaking down walls and starting something new.”

As a fan of the many adaptations of Sherlock Holmes, I was surprised that they had chosen to make this change. Now, as an avid viewer of Elementary, I can easily say that Lucy Liu is one of the best Watsons I have seen. Her character shows both strengths and weaknesses, intelligence and courage.  Watson is not just a sidekick to Holmes, she is now a full-on partner, helping and leading in cases. And the best part is that Liu has helped portray the Asian-American minority in media. I’ve rarely seen minorities as main leads in the TV I have watched, especially women of color.

Sources:

Lucy Liu Puts a New Spin on Sherlock Holmes’s Sidekick Watson

Dr. Joan Watson, Racism, And The Sherlock Vs. Elementary Backlash

TV: Halloween And New Shows

February 15, 2013
On February 5, 2013, Suzanne Venker posted “To be happy, we must admit women and men aren’t ‘equal,’” about how feminism has confused everyone on what men and women should and should not do in all aspects of life, but especially in ‘traditional’ marriages. She claims that feminists have indoctrinated women into believing that it’s ok to be single, get married later, and fight against what women ‘have always done.’ And this has somehow caused women to single-handedly ruin their marriages.
Because of course the idea that women no longer have to depend on a man or can do jobs and activities that once were closed off to them is what destroys a marriage. Women are not just the four stereotypes of “seductress or sex object, mother, pet, and iron maiden” (Race, Gender, and Stereotypes in the Media, 38). Just like men, women have all different types of abilities, likes, dislikes, and interests - but these are not connected to their gender. Marriages are not broken because women are no longer required to do what used to be their traditional roles, they are broken because of lack of mutual respect between the couple.
Sources:
To be happy, we must admit women and men aren’t “equal”
Original Fox Image

On February 5, 2013, Suzanne Venker posted “To be happy, we must admit women and men aren’t ‘equal,’” about how feminism has confused everyone on what men and women should and should not do in all aspects of life, but especially in ‘traditional’ marriages. She claims that feminists have indoctrinated women into believing that it’s ok to be single, get married later, and fight against what women ‘have always done.’ And this has somehow caused women to single-handedly ruin their marriages.

Because of course the idea that women no longer have to depend on a man or can do jobs and activities that once were closed off to them is what destroys a marriage. Women are not just the four stereotypes of “seductress or sex object, mother, pet, and iron maiden” (Race, Gender, and Stereotypes in the Media, 38). Just like men, women have all different types of abilities, likes, dislikes, and interests - but these are not connected to their gender. Marriages are not broken because women are no longer required to do what used to be their traditional roles, they are broken because of lack of mutual respect between the couple.

Sources:

To be happy, we must admit women and men aren’t “equal”

Original Fox Image

February 7, 2013

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

After the above newscast was shown and an accompanying article was released by NBC on February 3, 2013, many NBC viewers commented that Sarai Sierra’s death was an example as to  why women should not travel alone or without a man. This, of course, provoked many women travelers. A. Pawlowski, another NBC reporter, wrote another article about the comments and why the stereotype that women should travel in groups is outdated and degrading towards women. Editors of Wanderlust and Lipstick and JourneyWoman, websites focused on women travelers, commented that as long as all people, not just women, used common sense and planned ahead, any trip can be taken solo and with minimum worry.

This stereotype, though seeming innocent, is very harmful towards women. If women cannot travel alone, what else will they be forced not to do? What will they be forced to do? It suggests that women are not strong enough or smart enough to do things by themselves. Stereotypes “reflect the most simplistic either/or, categorical, and uncritical thinking; some may even say lack of thinking” (Race, Gender, and Stereotypes in the Media, 8). Women do not get hurt or killed on travels due to them being alone. They are attacked because their attacker decided to attack them. 

As a young woman who has traveled throughout the world and will mostly likely travel again, I do not believe that people should dictate how women should travel. While I personally prefer to travel with friends or family, I can also understand why others travel solo. But it is not my decision or anyone else’s on whether other women should explore the world by themselves or not. And the people who believe otherwise are submitting to a lack of thinking.

Sources:

New York City mom murdered on vacation in Turkey

Women’s solo travel under scrutiny after vacationer’s killing in Turkey